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DESIGNING THE ARCHIVE

PART 2 OF 3: COMMUNITY ARCHIVING

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“Designing the Archive” is the second installment in our Starting Conversations series on Community Archiving. Facilitator Shane Flores discusses the design process with two New Mexico Highlands University students who helped to design the Manitos Community Memory Project digital archives. Lilly Padilla and Natasha Vasquez also share their experiences with investigating their personal family and community histories and identities through this project.

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Lily Padilla is a New Mexico Highlands University graduate with a BFA in media arts with an emphasis in visual communications. She is currently working with an internship through the Media Arts and Technology department for the Manitos Community Memory Project. She works with graphic design, illustration and project management for Manitos. Lily is excited to contribute to the archive as part of connecting to her community.

Conceptual artist and interdisciplinary culture worker, Shane Flores is Community Facilitator for the Manitos Community Memory Project and is the principal at studio wetFuture, developing history and culture based content for cultural institutions, including The Bradbury Science Museum, The City of Las Vegas Museum, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs and UNM Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. He holds a BFA in Media Arts from New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Natasha Vasquez graduated from New Mexico Highlands University with a degree in media arts with an emphasis in multimedia and interactivity. She is currently doing an internship through Highlands working with the Manitos Community Memory Project. She feels incredibly grateful to be working on projects that are committed to archiving her community and culture. She mostly works on illustrations, animations, and some design.

Logo of the Manitos Community Memory Projects.

THIS PROGRAM WAS CREATED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH MANITOS COMMUNITY MEMORY PROJECT

Focused on a region whose people have been impacted by historic trauma and the consequences of extractive practices, the Manitos Community Memory Project (MCM Project) is set in an arc that begins with loss but bends toward restorative justice.