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LGBTQ+ HERITAGE MONTH READING AND DISCUSSION

Logo SOCIETY OF THE MUSE OF THE SOUTHWEST

SOMOS features a Writers Showcase writer in celebration of National LGTBQ+ month. Laura Jacobs, a trans queer woman, and clinical social worker is the editor of Surviving Transphobia – an Anthology of Trans Experiences. She will read from some stories and open a Q&A about trans experiences. The event is free, and books will be available for sale. This is a reading and discussion event.

SUMMER FAMILY DAYS AT HSFF’S EL ZAGUÁN

Two children making adobe bricks

June 21st, 9:30am-2:30pm

This year the Historic Santa Fe Foundation (HSFF) will present two free family days made possible thanks to funding from the New Mexico Humanities Council and National Endowment for the Humanities. HSFF invites the public to tour their grounds and interpretive space, participate in hands-on and kid-friendly adobe demonstrations led by HSFF Preservation Projects and Programs Manager Jacob Sisneros, and explore El Zaguán’s garden with Santa Fe Extension Master Gardener Ruthbeth Finerman to learn about the delicate balance of maintaining a historic garden in a water-thoughtful environment. Participants will receive an activity book about El Zaguán’s history that includes sections and conversation starters designed to help children and their families discuss their home neighborhood, vegetation, and cultural practices and how these shape identity and sense of place.

GATHERING OF NATIONS POWWOW: INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN CULTURAL EXCHANGE DISCUSSION FORUM

April 26th and 27th, times TBA (Mid-Morning—Early Afternoon)

Learn, share, and enjoy a truly unique international cultural exchange. The Gathering of Nations Powwow is hosting an International Cultural Exchange with Aboriginal Australians and individuals from tribes in New Mexico and across the United States. This is an opportunity for the public and all groups to share and participate in deepening the understanding of shared First Nations cultural practices, social issues, sacred land protection and other topics.

Join our International Speakers:
Nicole Brown — Larrakia First Nations of Australia;
Amber Shepard — Larrakia First Nations of Australia;
Jaynaya Winmar — Noongar/Balladong Tribes of Western Australia;
Matthew Bonson — Gurindji, Jaywon & Torres Strait Tribes of Northern Territory, Australia;
Dante Rodrigues — Tiwi Tribe of Northern Territory, Australia;
Jahdai Wilson-Vignoa — Tiwi Tribes of the Northern Territory, Australia;
Shannon Motlop — Indigenous from Northern Territory, Australia;
More Speakers TBA.

More information will be available at www.GatheringOfNations.com or contact project director, Melonie Mathews at: Melonie@GONMail.com.

EXPERIMENTS IN CINEMA V.19.8

In person — April 23rd-27th, Virtual Viewing — May 4th-18th
General admission $10 per day
Experiments in Cinema is an annual, transnational festival celebrating the current trends and history of international cinematic experimentation. Experiments in Cinema is a non-competitive festival produced by Basement Films. This year we are celebrating our 19th anniversary with a host of unique screenings (100 films from 30 countries). EIC also features special lectures, discussions and curated programs. The goal of Experiments in Cinema is to bring the international community of moving image artists to New Mexico to then inspire a new generation of movie makers to recognize the value of their media-voices and create films in ways we never imagined possible.

2024 RUIDOSO BOOKS AND WRITING FESTIVAL

April 13th, 10am-2pm

The 2024 Ruidoso Books and Writing Festival features several published New Mexico authors who will give readings of their work, offer writing activities for attendees, and lead discussions on literature and the publishing industry. Attendees can learn about a variety of literary genres: fiction, creative nonfiction, memoir, poetry, and graphic novels. There will also be information on how to get involved with local literary groups and communities. The festival will be a great place to meet other creative southern New Mexicans interested in books and writing.

Among the lineup, the festival showcases a selection of New Mexico’s celebrated authors, each bringing their own style and expertise to the event. Included in the festival are Teresa Dovalpage, a Cuban writer and columnist whose works narrate Cuban and Latino cultures; Laura Vazquez Lopez and her insights on the transformative power of creative writing; freelance cartoonist and illustrator Rick Geary, who adds a distinct visual storytelling element to the program; Joshua Wheeler, known for his thought-provoking essays and debut novel Acid West; Heather Franklin’s contributions in poetry and memoirs; and Allison Layfield, recognized for her emerging voice in poetry. The event promises to be a celebration of the written word, serving as a gateway to literary exploration and storytelling.

The festival is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

COMMUNITY IN CONFLICT: THE LEGACY OF THE SANTA FE INTERNMENT CAMP MARKER

group of people walking on a pilgrimage to the historic Santa Fe marker.

April 20th, 1-4pm

The New Mexico Japanese American Citizens League (NMJACL), in partnership with the New Mexico History Museum, presents a symposium on the Santa Fe Internment Camp and its historical Marker. The program includes: 1) screening of the documentary film “Community in Conflict,” followed by an audience talkback with the director, Claudia Katayanagi; 2) dramatizations by the readers theater group, JACL Players, of stories from inside and outside the barbed wire of the Santa Fe Internment Camp and the opposition to the creation of a memorial to the camp more than 50 years later; and 3) panel discussion on New Mexico’s efforts to preserve the legacy of Japanese American incarceration. Panelists include members of the 1999 Santa Fe Internment Camp Marker committee, the daughter of a Bataan Death March survivor, and city councilors present at the vote on the Marker. They explore both sides of the controversial Marker issue and parallels to current times.

For more information please contact project director Nikki Louis at: LouisNikki9@gmail.com.

MARTÍN ESPADA READING AND Q&A

Martín Espada has published more than twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His new book of poems, Floaters, is winner of the 2021 National Book Award. Other books of poems include Vivas to Those Who Have Failed (2016), The Trouble Ball (2011), The Republic of Poetry (2006), a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and Alabanza (2003). He has received the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, an Academy of American Poets Fellowship, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. A former tenant lawyer in Greater Boston, Espada is a professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL CONSERVANCY VIRTUAL SITE TOUR — EPISODE 8: THE LIVING LANDSCAPE OF MESA PRIETA

Please join The Archaeological Conservancy for the premiere of our newest Virtual Site Tour, Episode 8: The Living Landscape of Mesa Prieta. Our panel of speakers will include: Dr. Matthew Martinez, Director Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project; Dr.Chester Liwosz, Project Archaeologist Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project; Dr. John Kincheloe, Site Steward for the Cottonwood Petrogylph Preserve; April Brown, TAC Southwest Regional Director; and Mandy Woods, TAC Southwest Regional Rep.

Register to join us for an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the significant archaeological landscape.

THE LEUPP ISOLATION CENTER AND JAPANESE AMERICAN IMPRISONMENT ON DINÉ (NAVAJO) LANDS

Please join The Archaeological Conservancy for a virtual lecture featuring Davina Two Bears. Davina Two Bears is a Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow, from the School of Human Evolution and Social Change, at Arizona State University.

This talk will feature a discussion about the Leupp Isolation Center and Japanese American Imprisonment on Diné (Navajo) Lands. The Old Leupp Boarding School (OLBS), a historical archaeological site on the southwest Navajo reservation, is a significant place that is important to the Diné (Navajo) communities of Leupp and Birdsprings, Arizona. The U.S. Federal Government established this Federal Indian boarding school for Navajo children from 1909 to 1942. After the start of World War II however, the U.S. War Department reutilized the OLBS as a Japanese Isolation Center, the Leupp Isolation Center, in 1943.

This presentation will briefly explore the Leupp Isolation Center’s history of oppression of Japanese American citizens on Indigenous lands by the U.S. government.