CHOOSE A LANGUAGE BELOW

CONFINEMENT IN THE LAND OF ENCHANTMENT: JAPANESE AMERICAN PRISON CAMPS OF NM

Black and white headshot of Nikki Louis

Presented by Nikki Louis:

In her multimedia presentation, “Confinement in the Land of Enchantment”, Dr. Nikki Nojima Louis will share stories from both sides of the barbed wire of the all-male Department of Justice internment camps of Lordsburg and Santa Fe through slides and story depicting 1) the arrest and interrogation of Issei men (immigrants denied naturalization due to Asian exclusion laws) in the days, and even hours, following the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor; 2) stories from diaries and interviews of the incarcerees of Lordsburg and Santa Fe camps in which these men were held without just cause or due process; 3) childhood memories of the camp recounted by Santa Feans, including a history teacher, a retired pilot, a former mayor of Santa Fe, and the sons of two camp guards.

WHAT HAPPENED TO BLACKDOM?

Headshot of Dr. Timothy E. Nelson

Presented by Dr. Timothy E. Nelson
Blackdom is the only incorporated all-Black Town in New Mexico. New Mexico State Senator Cliff Pirtle (R-Roswell) introduced Senate Memorial 18 and Senate Memorial 71 during the 2023 session. This legislation recognized Blackdom as “the most influential Black settler community”. SM 18 passed one committee on March 13, but did not advance beyond that. The Blackdom descendant community is in constant communication exploring its past, present and future. This series of lectures, forums, colloquials, practical exercises and critical dialogue speaks to the complication of navigating a post-Obama and post-Trump world. At the core of the intersectional dialectic, we grapple with Blackdom’s current inaccessibility by public roads, requiring people to obtain permission to use private and government lands and roads. The task force is expected to include representatives from Chaves County, the New Mexico Counties association, New Mexico’s congressional delegation, the U.S. postmaster general, the State Historian’s Office, the State Land Office, the New Mexico Office on African American Affairs and some Blackdom property owners. The conversations can include theater, arts, and culture to grapple with the hard questions of what to do now; during the post-apocalypse period of the Twenty-First Century.

CULTURAL COMPLEXITY AND ABUNDANCE IN NEW MEXICO’S MUSIC

Photo of the 4 members of Lone Piñon

Presented by Lone Piñon
Lone Piñon is a collective of four expert musicians who travel the country and world performing their collaborative interpretation of the New Mexico musical traditions they have learned from elder culture-bearers. They will take us on a musical journey through the New Mexican musical landscape—through several centuries of bailes, wedding parties, fandangos, and fiestas that have shaped our musical inheritance. In addition to the vibrant performances, they’ll share anecdotes and history from the elders they’ve learned from that bring light to the unique cultural space they’ve inherited from their musical ancestors: a distinctly New Mexican landscape where the edges of cultures, ethnic groups, and civilizations overlap, communicate, and ultimately form a distinct musical voice that has much to say about our past, present, and future as ethnically and culturally diverse New Mexicans.

THE WANDERING BALLAD

Photo of Scott and Johanna Hongell-Darsee. Scott is playing guitar and Johanna is dancing in the background

Presented by Scott and Johanna Hongell-Darsee
People have sung stories since times immemorial as a way to memorize and record history and myths. A kind of stone age database. The songs we today call medieval and traditional ballads have their roots among Nordic epic sagas, French romantic lays, Celtic lore and World mythology. As the songs have traveled, they have metamorphosed and melted into various musical traditions, weaving a world of fantasy and mystery. Scott and Johanna Hongell-Darsee are a duo who perform early traditional ballads, songs and tales from Scandinavia, The British Isles and other parts of the world. Their performances blend both modern and traditional instruments in unique, original arrangements. Their wanderings have led them from Finland and Iowa respectively— through Europe, Scandinavia, India, and North America. On the way they have picked up tales and songs that they perform together with the stories behind them, in particular exploring the links between these story singing traditions. This program is suitable for adult as well as mixed all ages audiences.

ROSALIA CANTA NUEVO MÉXICO

Photo of Rosalia and Estevan Pacheco in front of the Sandia Mountains. Estevan is holding a guitar

Presented by Rosalia and Estevan Pacheco
This program explores the music and dance of New Mexico. New Mexico’s rich musical history comes to life through audience participation. Audience members are provided with printed materials to preserve the important musical treasures for generations to come. This program is accompanied by guitarist Estevan Pacheco.

TRADITIONAL STORIES FROM NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

Black and white headshot photo of Paulette Atencio

Presented by Paulette Atencio
Atencio delights audiences with cuentos (stories) learned growing up in Penasco, NM and a lifetime traveling northern and central New Mexico. Stories can be told in English or Spanish, to adults or children. The stories focus on traditions, what it means to be of Hispanic descent, and universal humor and lessons.

ANTHEMS OF BELONGING: FOR A NEW AMERICA

Headshot of Hakim Bellamy

Presented by Hakim Bellamy
Part songwriting workshop, part poem writing workshop, this workshop will analyze, deconstruct and reconstruct an anthem. Any anthem! Starting with the Star Spangled Banner and building from there, participants will both be invited to bring an anthem (regardless of national origin) or song that speaks to their values and notions of identity. By the end of the workshop, the group will collectively craft an “Anthem of Belonging” after creatively navigating a dialogue of complementary and conflicting aspirations for our community. The workshop will include writing, singing, sharing, laughing, clapping, possibly even dancing and a beginner-level discussion of music theory and the semiotics of music. No prior (musical) experience needed!

ICONS AND SYMBOLS OF THE BORDER

Headshot of speaker Dianna Molina

Presented by Diana Molina
Regional artist Diana Molina will present an eclectic, multi-faceted portrayal that embodies the spirit of New Mexico’s heritage through symbols and iconographic representations, sometimes with a distinctly modern twist. A photographic collection illustrates popular symbols and those less familiar. The Virgin of Guadalupe and Mimbres Rock Art are among the topics covered in a presentation that includes a blend of tradition, history, contemporary culture, and nature and socio-political subject matter. Touching on the current issues that face our borderland community, the artist’s work as a photographer and exhibit curator provides a compelling representation of topics relevant to the national conversation and our place within it.

TRADITIONAL STORIES OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

Headshot of Paulette Atencio

Presented by Paulette Atencio
Atencio delights audiences with cuentos (stories) learned growing up in Penasco, NM and a lifetime traveling northern and central New Mexico. Stories can be told in English or Spanish, to adults or children. The stories focus on traditions, what it means to be of Hispanic descent, and universal humor and lessons.

AN AMERICAN DIALOGUE: LATIN AMERICAN BALLADS, CUMBIA, AND NUEVA CANCÍON

Muscian Chuy Martinez

Presented by Chuy Martinez
For decades, a rich conversation has been exchanging musical ideas between the Americas: the ballad, from Spain and Mexico; the cumbia, of Caribbean African/Indian roots; and nueva canción (new song), social struggle music influenced by U.S. labor and protest songs. Mr. Martinez puts the songs and rhythms in historical context.