CHOOSE A LANGUAGE BELOW

CONFINEMENT IN THE LAND OF ENCHANTMENT: JAPANESE AMERICAN PRISON CAMPS OF NM

Black and white headshot of Nikki Louis

Presented by Nikki Louis:

In her multimedia presentation, “Confinement in the Land of Enchantment”, Dr. Nikki Nojima Louis will share stories from both sides of the barbed wire of the all-male Department of Justice internment camps of Lordsburg and Santa Fe through slides and story depicting 1) the arrest and interrogation of Issei men (immigrants denied naturalization due to Asian exclusion laws) in the days, and even hours, following the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor; 2) stories from diaries and interviews of the incarcerees of Lordsburg and Santa Fe camps in which these men were held without just cause or due process; 3) childhood memories of the camp recounted by Santa Feans, including a history teacher, a retired pilot, a former mayor of Santa Fe, and the sons of two camp guards.

WHAT HAPPENED TO BLACKDOM?

Headshot of Dr. Timothy E. Nelson

Presented by Dr. Timothy E. Nelson
Blackdom is the only incorporated all-Black Town in New Mexico. New Mexico State Senator Cliff Pirtle (R-Roswell) introduced Senate Memorial 18 and Senate Memorial 71 during the 2023 session. This legislation recognized Blackdom as “the most influential Black settler community”. SM 18 passed one committee on March 13, but did not advance beyond that. The Blackdom descendant community is in constant communication exploring its past, present and future. This series of lectures, forums, colloquials, practical exercises and critical dialogue speaks to the complication of navigating a post-Obama and post-Trump world. At the core of the intersectional dialectic, we grapple with Blackdom’s current inaccessibility by public roads, requiring people to obtain permission to use private and government lands and roads. The task force is expected to include representatives from Chaves County, the New Mexico Counties association, New Mexico’s congressional delegation, the U.S. postmaster general, the State Historian’s Office, the State Land Office, the New Mexico Office on African American Affairs and some Blackdom property owners. The conversations can include theater, arts, and culture to grapple with the hard questions of what to do now; during the post-apocalypse period of the Twenty-First Century.

CULTURAL COMPLEXITY AND ABUNDANCE IN NEW MEXICO’S MUSIC

Photo of the 4 members of Lone Piñon

Presented by Lone Piñon
Lone Piñon is a collective of four expert musicians who travel the country and world performing their collaborative interpretation of the New Mexico musical traditions they have learned from elder culture-bearers. They will take us on a musical journey through the New Mexican musical landscape—through several centuries of bailes, wedding parties, fandangos, and fiestas that have shaped our musical inheritance. In addition to the vibrant performances, they’ll share anecdotes and history from the elders they’ve learned from that bring light to the unique cultural space they’ve inherited from their musical ancestors: a distinctly New Mexican landscape where the edges of cultures, ethnic groups, and civilizations overlap, communicate, and ultimately form a distinct musical voice that has much to say about our past, present, and future as ethnically and culturally diverse New Mexicans.

ANTHEMS OF BELONGING: FOR A NEW AMERICA

Headshot of Hakim Bellamy

Presented by Hakim Bellamy
Part songwriting workshop, part poem writing workshop, this workshop will analyze, deconstruct and reconstruct an anthem. Any anthem! Starting with the Star Spangled Banner and building from there, participants will both be invited to bring an anthem (regardless of national origin) or song that speaks to their values and notions of identity. By the end of the workshop, the group will collectively craft an “Anthem of Belonging” after creatively navigating a dialogue of complementary and conflicting aspirations for our community. The workshop will include writing, singing, sharing, laughing, clapping, possibly even dancing and a beginner-level discussion of music theory and the semiotics of music. No prior (musical) experience needed!

COURAGE & COMPASSION: OUR SHARED STORY OF THE WWII JAPANESE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

Headshot of Nikki Louis

Presented by Nikki Nojima Louis

Nikki Nojima Louis presents stories from both inside and outside of the barbed wire of the prison camps of America that imprisoned more than 125,000 persons of Japanese ancestry during WWII. With knowledge gleaned from personal experience, memories of elders, and extensive research into oral histories and historical records, she has created a memorable experience through slides and stories that enables audiences to inhabit the history of a fraught era. “Courage and Compassion” is the story of Japanese immigrants who pursued the American dream and of their pride in their American-born children. It relates how, after the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, immigrant families were herded into prison camps in desolate areas of the United States and how many of their sons and daughter served in the American military, even while their families remained in behind barbed wire. It is also the story of courageous and compassionate friends, neighbors, and strangers who held out helping hands to Japanese Americans at a time of war hysteria and intense racial hatred. Presenter Louis is a childhood survivor of the WWII American prison camps. Her father was held in Santa Fe and Lordsburg internment camps from 1942 to 1946. She and her readers theater group, JACL Players, have presented “Living History” plays throughout New Mexico since 2014.

CULTURAL COMPLEXITY AND ABUNDANCE IN NEW MEXICO’S MUSIC

Photo of the 4 members of Lone Piñon

Presented by Lone Piñon
Lone Piñon is a collective of four expert musicians who travel the country and world performing their collaborative interpretation of the New Mexico musical traditions they have learned from elder culture-bearers. They will take us on a musical journey through the New Mexican musical landscape—through several centuries of bailes, wedding parties, fandangos, and fiestas that have shaped our musical inheritance. In addition to the vibrant performances, they’ll share anecdotes and history from the elders they’ve learned from that bring light to the unique cultural space they’ve inherited from their musical ancestors: a distinctly New Mexican landscape where the edges of cultures, ethnic groups, and civilizations overlap, communicate, and ultimately form a distinct musical voice that has much to say about our past, present, and future as ethnically and culturally diverse New Mexicans.

TRUTH, JUSTICE, AND THE AMERICAN: HOW COMICS ANIMATE CULTURE

Headshot of Jeff Benham

Presented by Jeff Benham

Modern comics are generally considered to have risen from sociopolitical cartoons around the turn of the twentieth century. Despite their “grown-up” inception, comics quickly came to be considered merely “kid stuff.” Reflection on their actual history reveals comics to not only offer up a mirror of our fears and beliefs, but to in fact be an active force in the evolution of our culture.

Delight as the limits of creativity are shattered! Escape with the unexpected monsters of our dreams! Thrill as the Captains of America tackle the Axis! Tremble as Congress contemplates comics’ delinquency! Raise a fist as The Man pulls comics underground! Celebrate as comics unloose the broad American voice! Squirm as comics struggle to define “created equal!” Look! Up in the Sky! It’s not a bird! It’s not a plane! It’s comics fighting for us all! (And we don’t always agree!)

ICONS AND SYMBOLS OF THE BORDERLAND, ART FROM THE US-MEXICO CROSSROADS

Headshot of Diana Molina

Presented by Diana Molina
View the US-Mexico borderland saga through the eyes of artists who’ve lived it. Based on a book and a traveling exhibit curated by Diana Molina, images explore the region’s animal and plant ecosystems, food and religious culture, and history. Artworks represent a variety of mediums as artists reflect deep roots both north and south of the border and the inherent mestizaje, a blend of indigenous, Mexican, and American heritage across the length of the bicultural, binational landscape. The vibrant presentation speaks constructively to regional issues while it shares unique perspectives of the US-Mexico crossroads at a critical point in US history.

DIVERSITY, RESILIENCE, INCLUSIVITY: THE FILIPINO IDENTITY IN A FOREIGN LAND

Headshot of Jeron Velasco

Presented by Jeron Velasco
Filipinos are the third biggest Asian population in the United States according to Pew Research 2021. With the growing numbers of Filipino professionals and families settling in the state to work in the academic and medical field, Filipinos brought not only their skills and talent but also their culture, language, food and values to the communities they chose to serve. The presentation is about the coexistence and resilience of Filipino community and culture in the United States at the heart of one of the Native American reservations in New Mexico, the Zuni Pueblo. This study presents the perspective of Filipinos in a foreign land in respect of cultural preservation, generational changes and challenges and approaches for healthy sustainable coexistence. This centers on the stories of Filipino families’ persistence on discipline, culture, faith, family values, language and communal connections way back home and to the host community. The presentation will detail the cultural and social origins of Filipino beliefs, traditions and customs influenced by its colorful history touched by Austronesian, Chinese, Arab, Spanish, Japanese and American visitors. Coming from different 171 ethnic groups themselves, this paper will provide a picture of intra-cultural dynamics among Filipino families in a distant land.

ICONS AND SYMBOLS OF THE BORDERLAND, ART FROM THE US-MEXICO CROSSROADS

Headshot of Diana Molina

Presented by Diana Molina
View the US-Mexico borderland saga through the eyes of artists who’ve lived it. Based on a book and a traveling exhibit curated by Diana Molina, images explore the region’s animal and plant ecosystems, food and religious culture, and history. Artworks represent a variety of mediums as artists reflect deep roots both north and south of the border and the inherent mestizaje, a blend of indigenous, Mexican, and American heritage across the length of the bicultural, binational landscape. The vibrant presentation speaks constructively to regional issues while it shares unique perspectives of the US-Mexico crossroads at a critical point in US history.